Escif’s anti-establishment street art directly from Valencia

This post is also available in: Español (Spanish)

Escif’s identity has been a mystery for more than 20 years

It was in the late 90s when the streets of Valencia were lined up with small minimalist murals. At first glance, they tried to communicate something. Here is where Escif’s work began.

Courtesy: Streetagainst

Thus, protest, satire, and subversive messages began to invade the Valencian streets. The images have no meaning until the viewer himself builds his own vision from observation and inference. Hence, the artist becomes an anonymous tool of the idea.

Courtesy: Hisour

At first glance, we could argue that these are simple pieces; with a low degree of difficulty. However, it is a minimal but powerful aesthetic. Smooth strokes with a tough critique of the system and external agents that corrupt societies.


Rethinking urban art as a reading of political subversion

To think of Escif is synonymous with activism made art. Through it, he presents the topics of social interest, such as capitalism, politics, the economy and our impending dependence on technology, among others. Interestingly, these are elements that make the artist’s pieces recognizable.

Courtesy: Streetagainst

For example, black holes, walls, objects that seem to fall from the sky; people in situations of inequality, etc. In other words, Escif’s work initially creates powerful concepts. Thus, aesthetics become a complementary element, but it’s not everything.

Courtesy: Streetagainst

Although they call him the Banksy of Valencia, the artist does not seek recognition or personal fame. Consequently, his pieces create awareness through art. An escape valve that gives voice to phenomena such as the Gürtel case, the Valencian Spring or the economic cuts in his country.

Courtesy: Streetagainst

In conclusion, to understand the artist’s work is an exercise in self-criticism that seeks to rethink our ethical values in society. A pictorial rebellion committed to social, economic and media events. An echo that resonates in London, Mexico, Berlin, Miami and other countries where he has placed his work.

Courtesy: Streetagainst

“Let’s not kid ourselves, graffiti is not a pleasant phenomenon for the system, no matter how much we try to agree that it is street art. Graffiti is a cry in the air, coded, which the system cannot understand and that is precisely why it fears it,” he asserts.

Courtesy: Streetagainst

Finally, we invite you to learn more about his social criticism through urban art on his official website.

This post is also available in: Español (Spanish)

Fernando Huacuz

Ciudad de México, 1988- En búsqueda constante de urdimbres visuales y narrativas en espacios públicos y privados. Arte, cultura y rocksteady un must.

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