Categories: Photography

José Ferreira portrays a stark reality of Portugal

This post is also available in: Español (Spanish)

Photographer José Ferreira presents portraits of traffickers and families

On the foothills of the city of Lisbon, is the 6 de Maio neighborhood, in the municipality of Amadora. A town that became the refuge of hundreds of low-income families, the ones José Ferreira presents in this series.

Courtesy: José Ferreira
Courtesy: José Ferreira

6 de Maio has the largest number of traffickers in the area. Repudiation and marginalization is a reality in this part of Lisbon. The otherness that not many care about. A very distant world from the tourist hustle and bustle that exists in the city center. A no man’s land where every day is about surviving.

José Ferreira’s lens reached all the way to the remnants of this neighborhood to rescue a reality of the Cape-Verdians. A place where “not even the police go in.” Thus, we’ll see street portraits that have seen everything: chaotic evictions, encounters with the police, and relocations.

Courtesy: José Ferreira

It is a photographic compilation that shows us the stark reality of a ghetto that, since the 70s and 80s, has remained in resistance. The photographer conducted a social study of just over a year and portrayed this neglected social sector without filters.

“They come from poor families, are born in the ghetto and have very little. They see crime as a way to get money easily and have nothing to lose,” explains the photographer. However, this project started when the demolition of one of the last neighborhoods began.

Courtesy: José Ferreira
Courtesy: José Ferreira


The photographer points out that people are wary but very modest, and everyone takes care of each other

Consequently, Ferreira ventured into that territory where looks rebuked and mistrust was present. It was a neighborhood isolated from the world, from modernity. However, his feat resulted in great documentary work.

“Going into the neighborhood was complicated. They are very wary and closed to the outside world. But after meeting them and making yourself known, they are very simple, humble and friendly,” he adds. On the contrary, the photographer found himself in a world where everyone protects everyone.

Courtesy: José Fereira
Courtesy: José Fereira

The neighborhood, the drugs, the brotherhood, and the run-down buildings are the main protagonists of this series. A series worth analyzing to discover other realities around the world. Did you like Fereira’s work? Check out more on his website.

This post is also available in: Español (Spanish)

Fernando Huacuz

Ciudad de México, 1988- En búsqueda constante de urdimbres visuales y narrativas en espacios públicos y privados. Arte, cultura y rocksteady un must.

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